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Charles “Martel”, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia

Male 676 - 741  (65 years)


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  • Name Charles “Martel”  
    Suffix Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia 
    Born 676  Herstal, Liège, Wallonia, Belgium Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 15 Oct 741  Quierzy-Sur-Oise, Aisne, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Basilica of Saint Denis, Saint Denis, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • “CHARLES “Martel”, son of PEPIN [II] "le Gros" or "d'Herstal" & his second [wife] Chalpais [Alpais] ([690]-Quierzy-sur-Oise, Aisne 16 or 22 Oct 741, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint Denis). The Chronicon Moissiacense names "Karolum" as soon of "Pippinus præfatus princeps…ex alia uxore nomine Alpaigde". He was imprisoned by his father's first wife after his father died. However, the Neustrians revolted against Plectrudis, Charles escaped, was at first defeated by the Neustrianss, but won the battle of Amblève, near Liège, in 716. He was victorious at Vinchy, near Cambrai, 28 May 717 after which Chilperic II King of Neustria fled with his maior domus, leaving Charles unchallenged to succeed as maior domus in Austrasia. "Karolus" donated his part in "villa Bollane" to "monasterium Efternacum" by charter dated dated 23 Feb 717, which names "genitore meo Pippino". He conquered the Saxons in 718 and the Frisians in 719 when he captured Utrecht. He conquered the Neustrians, together with their ally Eudes Duke of Aquitaine, in 719. He released and recognised King Chilperic II, becoming maior domus in Neustria. "Theudericus rex Francorum" confirmed a donation to the abbey of St Denis on the request of "Carlo maiorem domus nostro" by charter dated 1 Mar 723. He defeated the Muslim invaders, under Abd-al-Rahman bin Abd Allah al-Ghafiqi [Governor of Andalucía], at Moussais near Poitiers 25 Oct 732. He extended his authority to other French provinces: Hunald Duke of the Aquitanians swore allegiance to him in 736, he subjugated Burgundy and Provence in 736-738. In 737, he omitted to nominate a successor on the death of King Theoderic IV, signalling the effective end of the Merovingian monarchy. The Annales Sancti Amandi record the death "741 Id Oct" of "Karolus dux Francorum". The necrology of the abbey of Saint-Denis records the death "XVII Kal Nov" of "Karolus princeps". The Continuator of Fredegar records the same date for his death and his burial place.
      m firstly CHROTHRUDIS, daughter of --- ([690]-[724/25]). The Annales Laureshamenses record the death in 724 of "Hortrudis". The Annales Mosellani record the death in 725 of "Chrothrud". Settipani quotes a name list in the Liber confraternitatum augiensis which reads in part "Karolus maior domus, Pippin rex…Karolus imperator…Ruadtrud, Ruadheid, Svanahild regina, Bertha regina, Hiltikart regina, Fastrat regina, Liutkart regina…". He makes the obvious links between "Karolus maior domus…Svanahild regina", "Pippin rex…Bertha regina" and "Karolus imperator…Hiltikart regina, Fastrat regina, Liutkart regina", deducing that "Ruadtrud, Ruadheid" must also be linked logically to "Karolus maior domus" because of the order in which the names are listed. The primary source which specifically names the first wife of Charles "Martel" has not been identified.
      m secondly (725) SUANACHILDIS [Suanhilde], niece of ODILO Duke of Bavaria, daughter of --- (-after 17 Sep 741). The precise parentage of Suanachildis is not known. The Continuator of Fredegar records that "matrona quondam…Beletrude et nepta sua Sunnichilde" were captured and taken to Austrasia by Charles "Martel" in [724/25]. Einhard names "Swannhilde neptem Odilonis ducis Baioariorum" as the mother of Grifo. The precise relationship between Suanhilde and Pilitrude, who was the wifife in turn of the brothers Grimoald and Theodoald, has not been identified. She instigated the marriage of her stepdaughter to Odilo Duke of Bavaria according to the Continuator of Fredegar[162]. After the death of her husband, she incited heer son to rebel against her stepsons. She was defeated and sent to the monastery of Chelles, Seine-et-Marne. "Karlus maiorum domus filius Pippini quondam" donated property "villa Clippiacum in pago Parisiaco" to the abbey of St Denis by charter dated 17 Sep 741, subscribed by "Radberti comitis, Raygaubaldi comitis, Salaconis comitis, matrone Sonechildis, Grifonis filii sui".
      Mistress (1): CHROTHAIS, daughter of ---. Settipani quotes a name list in the Liber confraternitatum augiensis, quoted above under Chrothrudis first wife of Charles "Martel", concluding that "Ruadtrud, Ruadheid" must be linked logically to "Karolus maior domus" because of the order in which the names are listed.
      Mistress (2): ---. The name of the second mistress of Charles "Martel" is not known.
      Charles "Martel" & his first wife had three children:
      1. CARLOMAN ([705/10]-4 Dec 754, bur Vienne, Isère). Einhard names "Karlomannum…et Pippinum atque Grifonem" as the three sons of "Karlus maior domus" when recording the latter's death. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Pipinumum, Karlomannum, Griphonem et Bernardum" sons of "Karolus senior…ex regina". "Karlomanni filii eius" subscribed the charter dated 1 Jan 722 under which "Karolus maiorum domus filius Pippini quondam" donated property "castrum…Fethna sitam in pagpago Nifterlaco" to the monastery "infra muros Traiecto castro". He succeeded his father as maior domus, jointly with his brother Pepin. They deprived their half-brother Grifo of his inheritance, and defeated him after he rebelled against them. In the division of territories agreed with his brother, Carloman governed Austrasia, Alemannia, Thuringia and northern Alsace. The brothers were faced with revolts in Frisia, Bavaria, Alemannia and Aquitaine. As a symbolic assertion of their authority, they nominated Childeric III as [Merovingian] king in 743. Einhard records that "Karlomannus" was in Saxony at "castrum Hohseoburg" and there accepted the surrender of "Theodericum Saxonem illius loci primarium" in 743. "Childerichus rex Francorum" with "Karolomanno maiores domus, rectori palatio nostro" confirmed donations to the monastery of Stablo and Malmedy by charter dated Jul 744. In 745, Carloman's brother Pepin appropriated the province of Alemannia for himself. Carloman reasserted his authority with an expedition against the Alemans in 746, massacring the leaders who had betrayed him to his brother. This triggered the defection of his other supporters, and Carloman relinquished power. The Chronicocon Sancti Medardi Suessionensis records that “Carlomannus frater Pippini junioris” became a monk in 745 and that “Pippinus junior parvus frater eius” obtained the whole of “Principatum Francorum”. The Royal Frankish Annals record that, after 115 Aug 747, he left for Rome, where he built the monastery of St Sylvester on Monte Soracte before moving to the monastery of St Benedict at Monte Cassino where he became a monk. He returned to France in 753 to oppose the request by Pope Stephen III (II) for Frankish help against the Lombards. The Annales Moselleni record the death in 754 of "Karlamannus". m ---. The name of Carloman's wife is not known. Carloman & his wife had [three or more] children:
      a) DROGO ([730/35]-after 753). "Karlemannus maiorum domus filius quondam Karoli" made a donation of property including "villa…Levione…in pago Condustrinse…" to "monasterio Stabulaus seu Malmundario" dated 8 Jun [746], subscribed by "Drogone filio eius"[174]. He succeeded his father in 747 as maior domus. His uncle Pepin set him aside in 753 and sent him to a monastery where he died soon after.
      b) [other children. Settipani refers to texts which refer to "the children of Carloman" without naming them, but he does not cite these sources.]
      2. PEPIN [III] (715-Saint-Denis 24 Sep 768, bur église de l'abbaye royale de Saint Denis). Einhard names "Karlomannum…et Pippinum atque Grifonem" as the three sons of "Karlus maior domus" when recording the latter's death. The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Pipinum, Karlomannum, Griphonem et Bernardum" sons of "Karolus senior…ex regina". He succeeded his father as maior domus jointly with his brother Carloman. He succeeded in 751 as PEPIN “le Bref” King of the Franks.
      3. CHILTRUDIS [Hiltrude] (-754, bur Hostenhoven, Kloster Gengenbach). The Continuator of Fredegar names "Chiltrudis" as daughter of Charles "Martel", stating that her "wicked stepmother" incited her to joined Odilo of Bavaria whom she married without the permission of her brothers. After the death of her husband, she was regent in Bavaria for her son Duke Tassilo III. The Annales Moselleni record the death in 754 of "Hildtrud". m (741) ODILO Duke of Bavaria [Agilolfinger], son of --- (-18 Jan 748, bur Hostenhoven, Kloster Gengenbach). His brother-in-law Carloman invaded Bavaria, and Odilo was forced to recognise Frankish suzerainty in 744.
      Charles "Martel" & his [first/second wife/mistress] had two possible children:
      4. [LANDRADA . Settipani quotes an Aquitaine necrology which lists "Willelmus…pater eius Theodericus, mater Aldana soror Hiltrudis et Landradæ". He suggests that "Hiltrudis" was the wife of Odilo Duke of Bavaria, and therefore that all three ssisters were daughters of Charles "Martel". The theory is attractive but not conclusive, as its validity depends on there being no other contemporary Hiltrudis, which is not provable. If it is correct, there is no indication about the mother of Landrada and Aldana. Hlawitschka highlights the case against the affiliation.]
      5. [ALDANA . Settipani quotes an Aquitaine necrology which lists "Willelmus…pater eius Theodericus, mater Aldana soror Hiltrudis et Landradæ". He suggests that "Hiltrudis" was the wife of Odilo Duke of Bavaria, and therefore that all three sisters were daughters of Charles "Martel". The theory is attractive but not conclusive, as its validity depends on there being no other contemporary Hiltrudis, which is not provable. If it is correct, there is no indication about the mother of Landrada and Aldana. Hlawitschka highlights the case against the affiliation. "Willelmus…comes" names "genitore meo Theuderico et genitrice mea Aldana" in his charter dated 14 Dec 804 (version two: dated 15 Dec 804) for the foundation of the monastery of Gellone m THEODERIC Comte d'Autun, son of --- (-before 804).]
      Charles "Martel" & his second wife had one child:
      6. GRIFO ([726]-killed in battle Saint Jean de Maurienne 753). Einhard names "Karlomannum…et Pippinum atque Grifonem" as the three sons of "Karlus maior domus" when recording the latter's death, specifying that "Grifo…minor natu…matrem habuit Swannhilde neptem Odilonis ducis Baioariorum". The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Pipinum, Karlomannum, Griphonem et Bernardum" sons of "Karolus senior…ex regina". "Karlus maiorum domus filius Pippini quondam" donated property "villa Clippiacum in pago Parisiaco" to the abbey of Saint-Denis by charter dated 17 Sep 741, subscribed by "Radberti comitis, Raygaubaldi comitis, Salaconis comitis, matrone Sonechildis, Grifonis filii sui". His father bequeathed to Grifo the central part of his territory, but his stepbrothers Carloman and Pepin deprived him of this inheritance and split the land between themselves. Grifo rebelled, incited by his mother, but was defeated at Laon and imprisoned by Carloman at Neufchâteau in the Ardennes. He was released in 747 by his brother Pepin and fled to Saxony, where he raised an army although armed conflict was avoided. He invaded Bavaria where he was recognised as Duke in 748 in succession to Duke Odilo, but was deposed by Pepin who installed their nephew Tassilo III as duke. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 748 Pepin granted Grifo the duchy of Mans and twelve counties in Neustria, although the source does not identify these counties more precisely. The Continuator of Fredegar records that in 748 "germanus ipsius rege…Gripho" fled once more and allied himself with Waifar Duke of the Aquitanians. Grifo rebelled yet again, in alliance with the Bretons. He fled to Lombardy to join Aistulf King of the Lombards but was caught and killed while he was passing the Alps by "Theudoeno comite Viennense…et Frederico Ultraiurano comite", two of Pepin's supporters. His escape to Italy, capture and death at the hands of "Theodoino comite in valle Maurienna" is also recorded in the Annales Laurissenses. m ---. The name of Grifo's wife is not known. Grifo & his wife had [two possible] children:
      a) [GRIFO . Settipani refers to a commemorative name list from Remiremont in which the names "Griffo, Carolus" follow immediately after another "Griffo", which may indicate that the former were sons of the latter, although even if this is correct there is no proof that the latter Grifo was the same person as the son of Charles "Martel".]
      b) [CHARLES . Settipani refers to a commemorative name list from Remiremont in which the names "Griffo, Carolus" follow immediately after another "Griffo", which may indicate that the former were sons of the latter, although even if this is correct there is no proof that the latter Grifo was the same person as the son of Charles "Martel".]
      Charles "Martel" had one illegitimate son by Mistress (1):
      7. BERNARD (before 732-787). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Pipinum, Karlomannum, Griphonem et Bernardum" as sons of "Karolus senior…ex regina". Comte.
      Charles "Martel" had two illegitimate sons by Mistress (2):
      8. HIERONYMUS (-after [782]). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Remigium et Geronimum" as sons of "Karolus senior…ex concubina". Comte. Abbé de Saint-Quentin.
      9. REMIGIUS (-787). The Genealogica Arnulfi Comitis names (in order) "Remigium et Geronimum" as sons of "Karolus senior…ex concubina". Bishop of Rouen 755-771. The Annales Moselleni record the death in 787 of "Remigius et Bernehardus".”



      “Became Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia when his father, Pepin II, died in 714. That year he was imprisoned by his step-mother Plectudis, but escaped later in the year to lead the Austrasian and Neustrian nobles. The next year, the new King Chilperic II refused to act as a puppet to the nobles, and was backed by the Aquitaine duke Eudo, who was by then semi-independent from Frankish sovergnty. In 719, Charles defeated Eudo and took Chilperic hostage. Eudo's terms for mercy were that CChilperic would be recognized as sole ruler of the Franks, and that Charles would control all royal offices (i.e. as Mayor). Eudo had no other choice but to accept. In 720, Chilperic II died, Theuderic IV became king, Charles was stripped of his positions, Eudo was able to attain full independence, and Charles was preoccupied with pushing back Saxon invaders across the Rhine.
       
      In 732 Charles Martel and his barbarian Frankish army fought a battle near Tours, France, that affected the history of Europe. Their foes were inspired Muslim, or Saracen, troops who were bent on world conquest for the religion of Islam. In a huhundred years the Saracens had established a vast empire that stretched from Persia (now Iran) westward across northern Africa. They had gained a foothold in Europe by taking Spain. As they advanced into the region that is now France, the fate of Christian Europe hung in the balance. Charles met the Muslim forces between Poitiers and Tours. In a fierce and bloody battle the Muslims were defeated and their leader killed. In later campaigns Charles drove them back into Spain. His vigorous blows earned him the nickname Martel, from a French word meaning "hammer." This forceful leader never became king of the Franks. As mayor of the palace under ineffectual Merovingian kings, however, he was the true ruler. He increased the influluence of the Frankish kingdom in wars against the Alemanni, Bavarians, and Saxons. These and other Germanic tribes had overrun Europe when the Roman Empire crumbled. Only the Franks established a permanent kingdom. Charles aided St. Boniface and other missionaries in spreading Christianity and civilization among the barbarians. He strengthened the hold of the kingdom over the powerful nobles and bishops who sought to set up independent rule in their districts. He distributed land to his nobles to gain their loyalty and service as warriors. Charles prepared the way for his son, Pepin the Short, to gain the Frankish throne. Together they laid the foundation for the reign of Pepin's son Charlemagne.”

      From the Catholic Encyclopedia, copyright © 1913 by the Encyclopedia Press, Inc.
Electronic version copyright © 1996 by New Advent, Inc.”: “Born about 688; died at Quierzy on the Oise, 21 October, 741. He was the natural son of Pepin of Herstal and a woman named Alpaïde or Chalpaïde. Pepin, who in 714, had outlived his two legitimate sons, Drogon and Grimoald, and to Theodoald, a son of the latter and then only six years old, fell the burdensome inheritance of the French monarchy. Charles, who was then twenty-six, was not excluded from the succession on account of his birth, Theodoald himself being the son of a concubine, but through the influence of Plectrude, Theodoald's grandmother, who wished the power invested in her own descendants exclusively.
To prevent any opposition from Charles she had him cast into prison and, having established herself at Cologne, assumed the guardianship of her grandson. But the different nations whom the strong hand of Pepin of Herstal had held in subjections, shook off the yoke of oppression as soon as they saw that it was with a woman they had to deal. Neustria gave the signal for revolt (715), Theodoald was beaten in the forest of Cuise and, led by Raginfrid, mayor of tthe palace, the enemy advanced as far as the Meuse. The Frisians flew to arms and, headed by their duke, Ratbod, destroyed the Christian mission and entered into a confederacy with the Neustrians. The Saxons came and devastated the country of ththe Hattuarians, and even in Austrasia there was a certain faction that chafed under the government of a woman and child. At this juncture Charles escaped from prison and put himself at the head of the national party of Austrasia. At first he was unfortunate. He was defeated by Ratbod near Cologne in 716, and the Neustrians forced Plectrude to acknowledge as king Chilperic, the son of Childeric II, having taken this Merovingian from the seclusion of the cloister, where he lived the namame of Daniel. But Charles was quick to take revenge. He surprised and conquered the Neustrians at Amblève near Malmédy (716), defeated them a second time at Vincy near Cambrai (21 March, 717), and pursued them as far as Paris. Then retracing his steps, he came to Cologne and compelled Plectrude to surrender her power and turn over to him the wealth of his father, Pepin. In order to give his recently acquired authority a semblance of
legitimacy, he proclaimed the Merovingian Clotaire IV King of Austrasia, reserving for himself the title of Mayor of the Palace. It was about this time that Charles banished Rigobert, the Bishop of Reims, who had opposed him, appointing in his stead the warlike and unpriestly Milon, who was already Archbishop of Trier.
The ensuing years were full of strife. Eager to chastise the Saxons who had invaded Austrasia, Charles in the year 718 laid waste their country to the banks of the Weser. In 719 Ratbod died, and Charles seized Western Friesland without any great resistance on the part of the Frisians, who had taken possession of it on the death of Pepin. The Neustrians, always a menace, had joined forces with the people of Aquitaine, but Charles hacked their army to pieces at Soissons. After this defeat they realized the necessity of surrendering, and the death of King Clotaire IV, whom Charles had placed on the throne but two years previously, facilitated reconciliation of the two great fractions of the Frankish Empire. Charles acknowledged Chilperic as head of the entire monarchy, while on their side, the Neustrians and Aquitainians endorsed the authority of Charles; but, when Chilperic died, the following year (720) Charles appointed as his successor the son of Dagobert III, Thierry IV, who was still a minor, and who occupied the throne from 720 to 737. A second expedition against the Saxons in 720 and the definitive submission of Raginfrid, who had been left the county of Angers (724), re-established the Frankish Monarchy as it had been under Pepin of Herstal, and closed the first series of Charles Martel's struggles. The next
six years were devoted almost exclusively to the confirming of the Frankish authority over the dependent Germamanic tribes. In 725 and 728 Charles went into
Bavaria, where the Agilolfing dukes had gradually rendered themselves
independent, and re-established Frankish suzerainty. He also brought thence the
Princess Suanehilde, who seems to have become hihis mistress. In 730 he marched
against Lantfrid, Duke of the Alemanna, whom he likewise brought into
subjection, and thus Southern Germany once more became part of the Frankish
Empire, as had Northern Germany during the first years of the reign. But at the
extremity of the empire a dreadful storm was gathering. For several years the
Moslems of Spain had been threatening Gaul. Banished thence in 721 by Duke
Eudes, they had returned in 725 and penetrated as far as Burgundy, where they
had destroyed Autun. Duke Eudes, unable to resist them, at length contented
himself by negotiating with them, and to Othmar, one of their chiefs, he gave
the hand of his daughter But this compromising alliance brought him into
disfavour with Charles, who defeated him in 731, and the death of Othmar that
same year again left Eudes at the mercy of Moslem enterprise. In 732
Abd-er-Rahman, Governor of Spain, crossed the Pyrenees at the head of an immense
army, overcame Duke Eudes, and advanced as far as the Loire, pillaging and
burning as he went. In October, 732, Charles met Abd-er-Rahman outside of Tours
and defeated and slew him in a battle (the Battle of Poitiers) which must ever
remain one of the great events in the history oof the world, as upon its issue
depended whether Christian Civilization should continue or Islam prevail
throughout Europe. It was this battle, it is said, that gave Charles his name,
Martel (Tudites) "The Hammer", because of the merciless way iin which he smote
the enemy.
The remainder of Charles Martel's reign was an uninterrupted series of
triumphant combats. In 733-734 he suppressed the rebellion instigated by the
Frisian duke, Bobo, who was slain in battle, and definitively subdued Friesland,
which finally adopted Christianity. In 735, after the death of Eudes, Charles
entered Aquitaine, quelled the revolt of Hatto and Hunold, sons of the deceased
duke, and left the duchy to Hunold, to be held in fief (736). He then banished
the Moslems from Arles and Avignon, defeated their army on the River Berre near
Narbonne, and in 739 checked an uprising in Provence, the rebels being under the
leadership of Maurontus. So great was Charles' power during the last years of
hhis reign that he did not take the trouble to appoint a successor to King
Thierry IV, who died in 737, but assumed full authority himself, governing
without legal right. About a year before Charles died, Pope Gregory III,
threatened by Luitprand, King of Lombardy, asked his help. Now Charles was
Luitprand's ally because the latter had promised to assist him in the late war
against the Moslems of Provence, and, moreover, the Frankish king may have
already suffered from the malady that was to carry him off—two reasons that are
surely sufficient to account for the fact that the pope's envoys departed
without gaining the object of their errand. However, it would seem that,
according to the terms of a public act published by Charlrlemagne, Charles had, at
least in principle, agreed to defend the Roman Church, and death alone must have
prevented him from fulfilling this agreement. The reign, which in the beginning
was so full of bloody conflicts and later of such incessant strife, would have
been an impossibility had not Charles procured means sufficient to attract and
compensate his partisans. For this purpose he conceived the idea of giving them
the usufruct of a great many ecclesiastical lands, and this spoliation is what
is referred to as the secularization by Charles Martel. It was an expedient that
could be excused without, however, being justified, and it was pardoned to a
certain extent by the amnesty granted at the Council of Lestines, held under the
sons of Charles Martel in 743. It must also be remembered that the Church
remained the legal owner of the lands thus alienated. This spoliation and the
conferring of the principal ecclesiastical dignities upon those who were either
totally unworthy or else had naught but their military qualifications to
recommend them—as, for instance, the assignment of the episcopal Sees of Reims
of Reims and Trier to Milon—were not calculated to endear Charles Martel to the
clergy of his timeme. Therefore, in the ninth century Hincmar of Reims related the
story of the vision with which St. Eucher was said to have been favoured and which showed Charles in hell, to which he had been condemned for robbing the Church of its property.
But notwithstanding the almost exclusively warlike character of his reign,
Charles Martel was not indifferent to the superior interests of civilization and
Christianity. Like Napoleon after the French Revolution, upon emerging from the
years 715-719, Charles, who had not only tolerated but perpetrated many an act
of violence against the Church, set about the establishment of social order and
endeavoured to restore the rights of the Catholic hierarchy. This explains the
protection which iin 723 he accorded St. Boniface (Winfrid), the great apostle of
Germany, a protection all the more salutary as the saint himself explained to
his old friend, Daniel of Winchester, that without it he could neither
administer his church, defend his clergy, nor prevent idolatry. Hence Charles
Martel shares, to a certain degree, the glory and merit of Boniface's great work
of civilization. He died after having divided the Frankish Empire, as a
patrimony between his two sons, Carloman and Pepin.
GODEFROID KURTH
Transcribed by Michael C. Tinkler”

««s61»», ««s87»» [1, 2]
    Person ID I10663  Lowell&Block
    Last Modified 18 Apr 2019 

    Father Pépin II “le Gros”, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia,   b. Abt 635, Herstal, Liège, Wallonia, Belgium Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Dec 714, Junille, Meuse, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 79 years) 
    Mother Alpais (Aupais, Elphide, Chalpaida),   b. 654, Herstal, Liège, Wallonia, Belgium Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 705, Orp-le-Grand, Orp-Jauche, Wallonia, Belgium Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years) 
    Family ID F3719  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Chrothrudis (Rotrude, Rotrudis),   b. 690, Moselle, Lorraine, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 724  (Age 34 years) 
    Children 
     1. Carloman I, King of the Franks
    +2. Pepin or Pippin “The Short”, Mayor of Neustria, King of the Franks,   b. 714, Austrasia, Kingdom of the Merovingien Franks Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Sep 768, Saint Denis, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)
     3. Childtrude (Hiltrude) VON BAYERN, Duchess of Bavaria
     4. Jerome, of France
     5. Landrada
    +6. Auda (Aude, Alda, Aldane),   b. Abt 726, Bavaria, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 18 Apr 2019 
    Family ID F3716  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Suanachildis or Suanhilde,   d. Aft 17 Sep 741 
    Children 
     1. Grifo,   b. 726,   d. 753  (Age 27 years)
    Last Modified 18 Apr 2019 
    Family ID F3718  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Chrothais, (concubine),   b. Abt 690 
    Children 
     1. Bernhard, Duke of the Austrasian Franks,   b. Abt 725, Austrasia, Kingdom of the Merovingien Franks Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 787  (Age ~ 62 years)
    Last Modified 18 Apr 2019 
    Family ID F3822  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 4 Mistress #2 
    Children 
     1. Hieronymous,   b. Between 725 and 730,   d. Aft 782  (Age ~ 58 years)
     2. Remigius, Bishop of Rouen,   d. Bef 787
    Last Modified 18 Apr 2019 
    Family ID F4381  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 676 - Herstal, Liège, Wallonia, Belgium Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 15 Oct 741 - Quierzy-Sur-Oise, Aisne, France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Basilica of Saint Denis, Saint Denis, Paris, France Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Sources 
    1. [S61] Charlemagne Family Genealogy., Hart, Jr., Albert D.

    2. [S87] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy., Foundation for Medieval Genealogy Trustees.